How do our expectations of reality translate to rape-revenge stories in film?

Warning: Spoilers + Trigger Warning (sexual assault)

The trailer for Promising Young Woman is misleading. If, like me, you were expecting a movie about a woman who targets scummy men at nightclubs by posing as helplessly drunk, goes home with them, and then murders them for their transgressions, you’d be wrong. That is, however, what it implies, and so when I didn’t see that play out in the opening scene, I was a little confused about where we were headed. …


A Korean family moves to the Ozarks to build their dream and steal our hearts.

As Oscar season approaches, I always find myself trying to catch up with nominated titles I may have missed or haven’t yet had a chance to see. Minari was the latter of these two. I’d heard about it long before I was actually able to stream it anywhere, and when critics began singing its praises, I was pretty sure my suspicions about it were right. …


When nomadic wanderlust becomes a way of life, what does it mean to maintain one’s independence?

Warning: Spoilers

After hearing widespread acclaim from critics on the various film podcasts I listen to, and being careful to avoid any in-depth discussions, spoilers, or reviews, I was curiously anticipating the wide release of Chloé Zhao’s Nomadland. Hulu released it late last month, and I was quick to pull the trigger, settling in for what, I didn’t quite know. What I came away with was something understated, moving, and quietly beautiful. I didn’t expect to connect with this film the way I did…


The Midnight Library by Matt Haig shows us that while ‘the perfect life’ might not exist, it may still be worth living.

Over the late summer, I listened to delightful little audiobook by Matt Haig called The Midnight Library. It was buoyant, witty, and full of whimsy, which I found rather impressive for a novel whose protagonist’s primary concern is ending her life. Normally I prefer to read physical books given the choice, but I’m a big fan of audiobooks for long car rides or when I’m out for a walk with my dog. If read by an engaging narrator…


“In & Of Itself” Explores the Impact of Identity, Perception, and Magic

For this month’s last post on the theme of love, I wanted to discuss and recommend the film, In & Of Itself, on Hulu. It’s described as “an intimate and powerful exploration of what it means to be and be seen,” which I would argue is at the core of love, in this case, self-love. Derek DelGaudio, the creator of this unique one-man show, seeks to find an answer to the question, “Who am I?” and manages to do so through a series of vignettes in which he recounts portions of his own life interspersed with segments of audience participation.


I have two recommendations for you this week, both fitting into this month’s love theme, and I could not be more stoked to talk about them. It seems that lately, I’ve really been digging on Steve McQueen. And just to clarify, I’m talking about the black, British director, not to be confused with the white American actor of the same name. …


Keeping with the theme of love this month, I bring you, Malcolm & Marie. This volatile drama shot beautifully in black and white by director, Sam Levinson, stars Zendaya as Marie and John David Washington, as her partner, Malcolm. It would be a stretch to say that I’m recommending this film because I’m pretty mixed on it at the moment. Beyond that, there were more than a few things that I didn’t quite think worked, but what I will say is that it was an experience I won’t soon forget. Dialog heavy, full of firey social commentary and gender politics…


I almost couldn’t believe it when I realized it was already February, but then again, quarantine life has made it nearly impossible for me to determine what day it is, so I’m just glad I have some grasp on our collective human timeline. Anyway, the theme for this month is… you guessed it, love. I chose this theme, not only because Valentine’s Day falls during February, but because love is a particularly difficult subject for me, perhaps like many others, to unpack. I struggle with my thoughts and feelings about various aspects of love, as well as being completely fascinated…


This week I’m recommending Netflix’s horror/thriller, directed by Remi Weekes, His House, which premiered at Sundance in 2020. This film cleverly marries its two central themes—the refugee-immigrant experience and the haunted house—in a way that I found both exciting and unsettling, and immensely creative. While the idea of starting a new life obviously lends itself to the theme of new beginnings, what’s more significant, and perhaps more interesting, for me, is Weekes’s direction, which breathes new life into the haunted house genre film.

In recent years, thanks to films like, Get Out (2017), Us (2019), and Midsommar (2019), just to…


Joe Biden at the 2021 Presidential Inaugruation
Joe Biden at the 2021 Presidential Inaugruation
Joe Biden at the 2021 Presidential Inauguration

Today was a historical day, not just for Americans but for modern democracy. Joe Biden and Kamala Harris were sworn in as the 46th President and 49th Vice President of the country, and for the first time in four years, many people — myself included—were finally able to breathe again. I won’t go too far down the controversial rabbit hole, because we all lived through the nightmarish reign of Donald Trump, but what I will say is this. Regardless of your political affiliations, it seems to me that we should all be able to agree on basic human decency. We…

Jamie Garcia

Just another movie-obsessed writer with a lot of opinions. Enjoy my weekly ramblings (sometimes) on a theme.

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